5 Enviable Residential Buildings in New York

5 Enviable Residential Buildings in New York

By Fred A. Bernstein

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4. FirmCookFox Architects.
Project: City Tower, downtown Brooklyn.
Site: The redevelopment of Brooklyn’s downtown reached a crescendo with the completion of a 700,000- square-foot mall and office complex, City Point, and its attached 48-story tower, both by CookFox Architects. To give the 440 apartments’ residents a private garden, Rick Cook oversaw the transformation of the mall’s roof. Grass and gravel are arranged in wavy patterns derived from Roberto Burle Marx’s Copacabana promenade in Rio de Janeiro. Other attractions include a boccie court, vegetable gardens, and seating areas.


Inside, to appeal to young professionals, the aesthetic is a more sophisticated take on Brooklyn than the hipster cliché. The ter­rarium on the concierge desk was supplied by a Park Slope gardening company, while the paneling behind the desk is reclaimed wood, joists from a Williamsburg warehouse. A Lindsey Adelman Studio chandelier is likewise locally made. For the lounge facing the roof garden, Cook chose the ultimate borough-specific wallpaper. Depicting stylized skeletons amid scenes from the neighbor­hood Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass, the pattern is called Dia de Dumbo. 


Firm: CookFox Architects. Project: City Tower, downtown Brooklyn. Brooklyn’s City Tower features outdoor spaces by Weintraub Diaz Landscape Architecture. Photography by Eric Laignel.


Firm: CookFox Architects. Project: City Tower, downtown Brooklyn. Dan Funderburgh designed wallpaper that was custom-colored for the lounge. Photography by Eric Laignel.


Firm: CookFox Architects. Project: City Tower, downtown Brooklyn. The basketball half-court’s cubbies are maple-veneered. Photography by Eric Laignel.


Firm: CookFox Architects. Project: City Tower, downtown Brooklyn. Painted steel chaise longues face the roof’s garden. Photography by Eric Laignel.


     

Firm: CookFox Architects. Project: City Tower, downtown Brooklyn. Lindsey Adelman Studio’s chandelier hangs near paneling in reclaimed wood. Photography by Eric Laignel.


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